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QuadraTherm 640i/780i Webinar Videos & Downloads

Thank you for attending our four-part webinar training series featuring Dr. Olin, the founder and inventor of the 640i/780i. Our webinar series is now complete and we have posted a video recording and Powerpoint from each webinar below. It always helps to review the training material again and share with others in your organization that may have missed it. If you ever have any questions, contact Maryadine Washington at m_washington@sierrainstruments.com

After you watch or re-watch the webinars, we would love your feedback on the series. Please click here Click here to take survey to let us know what you thought of the webinars.

Watch Webinar #1


© Copyright 2012 Sierra Instruments, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Download Powerpoint of Webinar 1

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Watch Webinar #2


© Copyright 2012 Sierra Instruments, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Download Powerpoint of Webinar 2

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Watch Webinar #3


© Copyright 2012 Sierra Instruments, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Download Powerpoint of Webinar 3

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Watch Webinar #4


© Copyright 2012 Sierra Instruments, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Download Powerpoint of Webinar 4

October 2014 Webinar: Sierra’s Year in Review- Get the Info You Need to Know to Grow Sales!

Thank you for attending “Sierra’s Year in Review – Get the Info You Need To Know to Grow Sales!” webinar training. Glen and the Sierra team enjoyed hearing from you and were impressed with the excellent global participation.

As you know, it always helps to review the training material again and share with others in your organization that may have missed it. Download the webinar power point and watch the webinar footage by clicking the links below.

If you ever have any questions about  the material or would like additional materials, please contact Maryadine Washington at m_washington@sierrainstruments.com

After you watch or re-watch the webinars, we would love your feedback on the series. Please click here Click here to take survey to let us know what you thought of the webinar.

Watch Webinar Video

 

Watch Video Footage of Team Sierra


Download Year in Review Webinar PDF

Key Content Resources
View Digital Communications Matrix
Download Digital Communications Cheat Sheet
In-Situ White Paper
In-Situ Validation Calibration Video
Dry Sense Video
How Thermal Dispersion Mass Flow Meter Technology Works (Principle of Operation video)

 

Webinar Video May 2015 – Selling More Sierra!

Team Sierra would like to thank you for participating in our webinar last Friday, May 15th, appropriately titled:  “Selling More Sierra”  Our CEO, Matthew Olin shared where Sierra is going in the future and VP Sales North America, Glen Coblentz went into detail about how to sell more Sierra today.  Our team was energized by the global participation and wants to extend a warm thank you to the more than 300 Sierra salespeople in attendance.

We believe, it always helps to review the training material again and share with others in your organization that may have missed it. Download the webinar power point and watch the webinar footage by clicking the links below.

If you ever have any questions about the material or would like additional materials, please contact Maryadine Washington at m_washington@sierrainstruments.com

After you watch or re-watch the webinar, we would love your feedback on the presentation. Please click here to take survey to let us know what you thought of the webinar.

Download Selling More Sierra-Application Sales Tips Webinar PDF

Watch Webinar Video

Webinar Key Content Resources
How qMix Works Video
In-the-Field Compensation for Changes in Natural Gas Composition
In-Situ White Paper
In-Situ Validation Calibration Video
Dry Sense Video
How Thermal Dispersion Mass Flow Meter Technology Works (Principle of Operation video)

Flare Gas Measurement Innovation: Retain Flow Metering Accuracy Even if Gas Composition Changes

flare-blog-imageIt’s a fact oil wells almost always produce natural gas along with the petroleum. Nine times out of ten, the excess gas (typically hydrocarbons) is flared off or simply vented as-is during upset conditions in the process. The environmental impacts of “flaring” this excess gas into our atmosphere has resulted in government regulations like 40 CFR Part 60 Subpart OOOO (also known as Quad O) as well as new RSR MACT rule for refineries requiring oil & gas companies to report the flare gas emitted.

Traditionally, in upstream oil and gas applications, orifice plates and turbine meters have been used to measure the flare gas to comply with these government regulations.  Thermal mass flow meters are also gaining ground as a reliable and accurate direct mass flow measurement of flare and combustor gas.

The Problem:

Most thermal mass flow meters, however, have an inherent disadvantage in the challenging flare gas measuring application because each well head has its unique and constantly changing characteristics including varying gas composition. Over the lifetime of the well, flare gas composition and density varies, so a typical total flare gas flow measurement error could be as high as 20%. Most thermal flow meters cannot manage these gas composition changes, as they are factory calibrated for a specific gas, and need to be sent back to the factory for recalibration for the new gas composition. This is not only time consuming for the oil & gas operators and engineers, but the flare must be shut down, the thermal meter taken out of the inlet flow, and sent to the factory for recalibration.

Recent Innovation, New Solution:

Today, a new generation of four-sensor “Quad” thermal mass flow meters retains accuracy even if gas composition changes.  Sierra’s QuadraTherm 640i/780i thermal mass flow meter, is becoming a popular choice for flare and combustor (VOC/VRU) measurement due to its unique onboard qMix gas mixing software which allows operators to manage the changes in flare gas composition in the field-no factory recalibration necessary. Operators can use the onboard qMix gas mixing software to select the new gas composition and upload this new gas into the QuadraTherm meter in the field in minutes. The accuracy of the flare gas measurement for this new gas composition is retained improving downtime and  EPA regulation compliance.

Benefits of QuadraTherm thermal mass flow meters in upstream oil & gas applications:

  • High Turndowns 100:1 and measures very low flows
  • Extreme accuracy +/- 0.75% of reading (+/- 0.5% for 780i inline with built in flow plates)
  • High flows up to 60,000 sfpm (0 to 305 smps)
  • Eliminate drift with patented DrySense™ sensor-Lifetime sensor
  • qMix Gas Mixing App manages changes in gas composition in the field—no recalibration needed
  • In-situ ValidCal™ Diagnostics, Dial-A-Gas & Dial-A-Pipe
  • Low and high-pressure hot tap
  • 40 CFR Part 60 (Quad 0), Boiler MACT Greenhouse Gas (GHG) certified

flare-gas-tech-note-thumb

New Flare Gas Measurement Application Tech Note!

Download our new Flare Gas Mass Flow Measuring Tech Note  for more information on how qMix gas mixing software makes QuadraTherm thermal mass flow meters the most flexible and economic solution for flare and combustor gas measurement.

The Perfect Biogas Flow Measurement Solution | Sierra Instruments

Solving the Biogas Flow Measurement Conundrum

In recent years, concern about climate change has increased interest in alternative energy sources, specifically in biogas energy.

Biogas energy can be extracted from landfills. Digester gas produced at wastewater treatment plants is another common form of biogas.

So why is it so popular? In a word, economy. This otherwise wasted biogas can be used for heating, electricity, or to fuel internal combustion engines—the possibilities are endless!

This, of course, has created a demand for biogas measurement solutions. Many flow meter companies have jumped into the biogas measurement market, but not all technologies can handle this tough application.

Let’s look at why biogas measurement is so challenging and how it can be best handled.

The Challenges

Accurate flow meter measurement is critical to optimal biogas energy collection, but these factors make it difficult:

Varying compositions

This is the biggest concern and the Achilles heel for many flow meter companies. Biogas composition can vary based on the source. Biogas typically contains about 55%-65% methane, 30%-35% carbon dioxide, and some hydrogen, nitrogen and other impurities.

However, a representative compositional analysis (in volumetric percentage), shown in Table 1, shows the wide ranges in methane composition between 50%-75% and carbon dioxide between 25%-50%. This represents how the biogas composition can change over time with changing conditions in the landfill or in the digester tank.

Table 1

Most flow meters are calibrated to measure one specific gas mix composition, and sending the meter back to the factory to be recalibrated every time there’s a change isn’t very efficient. In co-generation situations, facilities managers need to be able to depend on the accurate measurement of the biogas produced—in spite of varying gas composition.

Low pressure

Low pressure makes differential pressure devices, like orifice plates, unsuitable since they require a fairly large differential pressure to operate.

Clogging

Biogas is often very dirty, with a high moisture and particulate content that can clog up devices like annubars and orifice plates and gum up turbine meters and similar instruments that have moving parts.

Energy Content

Biogas produced from landfills has an additional issue: energy content. The heating value of landfill methane can be raised through adding make up natural gas as seen in the image below. But accurate flow meter measurement is critical to the process of obtaining optimal heat value.

biogas 1

Many thermal flow companies have entered this renewable energy market, but few have been able to solve these issues. Specifically, how can they make their flow meters automatically adjust for changing gas compositions?

The answer is, they can’t. The meters must be sent back to the factory for recalibration.

The Solution

Fortunately, advancements in thermal flow meter technology have not only made composition management possible, but highly accurate as well. However, few flow meter systems are available on the market today that can account for variable biogas composition.

QuadraTherm flow meters can. With an innovative design that maximizes four sensors instead of the traditional two, QuadraTherm handles this application without the need for constant recalibration.

quadratherm-640i_high

QuadraTherm meets the criteria for successful biogas measurement by managing changes in:

  • Gas composition
  • Gas mass flow rate
  • Gas temperature
  • Gas pressure
  • Outside temperature
  • Pipe conditions (size and roughness)
  • Flow profile

A Closer Look

QuadraTherm has moved thermal insertion flow meter technology into a realm of unprecedented accuracy. Readings of +/-0.75% of reading are now possible as opposed to the 2.0% readings of older thermal technologies.

Traditional analog measurement circuits, like the Wheatstone bridge, have been replaced with more powerful, hyper-fast microprocessors that run comprehensive flow-measurement algorithms to compute mass flow.

This proprietary algorithm set serves as the “brain” of the mass flow meter, using inputs from the four sensors to solve the first law of thermodynamics for the sensor in the biogas flow stream. This allows the precise calculation of heat convected away by biogas mass flow, providing accurate mass flow measurements in a fraction of a second.

This algorithm allows management of gas composition because now recalibration is not required every time the gas changes.

qMix Gas Mixing Software

The meter can hold up to four user-customizable gas mixtures onboard and store biogas composition in a proprietary gas library, easily accessed through user software called qMix™. Engineers and operators have access to this gas library, which contains all the gas properties needed to make algorithmic gas mass flow rate calculations.

Once sampling has determined the biogas composition, operators can use qMix™ to create and name a proprietary biogas mixture. This allows operators and engineers to use just one meter with one calibration for varying gas compositions, offering a major cost savings compared to continuous sampling devices

A Money-Saving Solution

Sierra’s QuadraTherm Series of mass flow meters is the perfect solution for successful biogas measurement in any environment. By eliminating the need for frequent recalibration, QuadraTherm can save companies thousands of dollars in calibration costs, shut downs and loss of gas monetization through loss of accuracy.

Download Whitepaper on Precise Biogas Measurement 

Thermal Mass Flow Meters Increase Boiler Efficiency in Co-generation Applications

Did you know most chemical plants use electricity derived from an on-site natural gas power plant or co-generation plant burning waste gas streams? 

In large boilers, power plants bring together air and fuel (natural gas, waste gas, oil or coal) for combustion, which creates heat. The heat boils the water, creating steam. The steam runs through a turbine, which causes the turbine to spin, thus generating electricity. Measuring the flow energy — flows that cost money such as natural gas, waste gas, water and steam — in these boiler applications is critical for improving energy efficiency, identifying waste and minimizing the greenhouse gases going into atmosphere. Only with accurate mass flow measurement can you make informed decisions to improve energy efficiency. Therefore, to improve boiler efficiency  it’s critical to know your options when selecting the appropriate flowmeter technology to measure natural gas, water and steam in power generation . 

Increasing Combustion with Optimal Fuel-to-air Ratio

Power generation requires inlet air and fuel (natural gas, waste gas, oil or coal) for combustion. Engineers must measure the air and gas ratio accurately for efficient combustion in the boilers. Too much gas is wasteful, dangerous and costly, and too little will create insufficient flame to boil the water efficiently.

Choosing the Right Meter to Monitor Fuel-to-air Ratio

Orifice and Turbine Meters. Monitoring fuel gas to boiler units traditionally is accomplished with an orifice or turbine meter. However, these are not the best measuring devices for this application because they both are subject to failure and require frequent skilled maintenance to provide an accurate and reliable measurement.

Constrained piping conditions can also give engineers headaches. For example, an orifice meter requires 10 to 50 diameters of upstream piping to eliminate the effect of flow disturbances. Because long straight pipe runs are hard to find, most flow measurement systems are affected adversely by varying flow profiles within the pipe.

The biggest cause for concern, however, is that orifice and turbine meters measure volumetric flow. Additional pressure, temperature and differential pressure sensors, as well as a flow computer, are required to calculate or infer mass flow. This not only degrades the flow measurement accuracy, but the installation and maintenance costs with this type of compensated measurement increase the cost of ownership.

Thermal Mass Flow Meters. In contrast, thermal mass flowmeters are suitable for the direct mass flow measurement of gases, not volumetric flow. Because thermal mass flowmeters count the gas molecules, they are immune to changes in inlet temperature and pressure and measure mass flow directly without compensation. In inlet air and gas flow boiler applications, thermal flowmeters perform well because the optimal fuel-to-air ratio for efficient combustion in boilers is calculated on a mass basis, not volumetric (Figure 3).

In a thermal flow meter’s simplest working configuration, fluid flows past a heated thermal flow sensor and a temperature sensor. As the fluid’s molecules flow past the heated thermal sensor, heat is lost to the flowing fluid. The thermal sensor cools down, while the temperature sensor continues to measure the flowing fluid’s relatively constant temperature. The amount of heat lost depends on the fluid’s thermal properties and its flow rate. Thus, by measuring the temperature difference between the thermal and temperature sensors, the flow rate can be determined. 

New developments in four-sensor thermal technology coupled with stable “dry sense” sensor technology as well as advanced thermodynamic modeling algorithms enable some thermal flowmeters to attain ±0.5% reading accuracy, rivaling Coriolis flow meter accuracy at less cost. On-board software apps also enable gas-mixing capability, in-situ validation, and dial-a-pipe.

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Case-in-Point. Purified Terephthalic Acid (PTA) in China uses Sierra’s thermal mass flow meters to improve boiler efficiency, cut costs and meet government regulations.

Purified terephthalic acid (PTA) is the precursor to polyethylene terephthalate (PET), the ubiquitous material used worldwide in plastic bottles, textiles and elsewhere. A PTA chemical plant in China generated steam and electricity from its on-site power plant using coal as a fuel. It also had a wastewater treatment station that produced methane, which then was flared off. Both processes are major greenhouse gas emitters.

New government regulations required the company to reduce its CO2 emissions. The plant decided to modify its four boilers to burn both coal and the previously flared-off waste gas (methane), estimating a savings of approximately $0.5 million in coal each year. Working with a single-source supplier, engineers reworked the boilers’ designs and installed Sierra Instruments’ industrial insertion thermal mass flowmeters to measure its combustion air and waste gas fuel, ensuring optimal combustion (Figure 7).

One thermal flowmeter measures the waste gas flow, while the other four thermal flowmeters provide sub-metering of this gas stream to each boiler. Another four meters measure pre-heated (200°C, 392°F) combustion air to each boiler, allowing the boiler control system to optimize the fuel-to-air ratio. The Sierra mass flow meters provided both precision flow data for complying with government regulations and helped the company reduce waste while increasing efficiency.

Discover More Ways to Improve Boiler Efficiency through Tuning your boiler  https://www.sierrainstruments.com/blog/?tuning-boiler-epa-boiler-mact-compliance.