Home » Sierra Blog » Part 2: For Steam Flow, Mass Vortex Flow Meters Are Ideal!
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Part 2: For Steam Flow, Mass Vortex Flow Meters Are Ideal!


Apr 18, 2012

In my last post, I discussed the problem of density errors creeping into steam flow measurements. When steam is superheated, you can determine density by the steam tables. But, as the vapor cools in a pipe, things aren’t so simple.

I said the answer to the conundrum is actually “blowing in the wind” – that a vortex flowmeter works much like a flag waving in the wind. Technically, this is known as a Von-Karman Vortex Street, and it turns out to be the ideal way to measure steam flow.

Bluff bodies can be made tough and rugged and are able to withstand the high temperatures of superheated steam. By adding a temperature and pressure transducer integral to the unit, mass flow can be measured.

If your application requires steam flow measurements, I recommend trying our Innova-Mass® Model 240. We developed this technology with you in mind (in fact, we were the first to come up with it) because we understand how important precision is when it comes to calculating vapor flow.

This particular flow meter is capable of measuring five process variables (temperature, pressure, mass flow, volumetric flow and density) at a single process connection.  The insertion version (Model 241) makes an ideal solution for big steam pipes.

At Sierra, we love tackling tough applications like steam flow. Do you need a special flowmeter for a particularly challenging problem? Contact us! I know we can find the solution.

Scott Rouse, Product Line Director
Written By:
Scott Rouse, Product Line Director
Sierra Instruments

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